Spontaneous Decision Making

Decision

This post is about my own decision-making habits. In particular, I don’t plan ahead details ahead of time, as I abhor fixed schedules or fixed paths. Perhaps an interesting case is from a 2011 post:

For example, last semester, to get to one of my classes from my dorm I had two main paths, one going over the Thurston Bridge and the other over a smaller bridge that went by a waterfall. For the first couple weeks I took the Thurston Bridge path exclusively, as I thought it was shorter than the waterfall path. But then one day I went the other path and timed it, with about the same time, maybe a minute slower (out of a total of 15 minutes). So I started taking the waterfall path exclusively. But eventually that got boring too, so I started alternating every time. You might think that’s how it ended.

But a consistent change like that is still… consistent. Still the same. It was still repetitive, and still very predictable. Perhaps the mathematical side of me started running pattern-search algorithms or something. Eventually, I ended up on a random schedule, not repeating the same pattern in any given span of 3 or 4 days.

This example involved physical paths, but it is true for figurative paths as well. I can’t stand any repetitive task for a long time, including for things that I might like.

Another set of examples comes from video games. I tend to play extremely flexible classes/builds that have multiple purposes, and I try to have multiple characters or styles to be able to adapt quickly and to know what other people are thinking:

  • World of Warcraft: 8 (out of 11) classes at level 85+; raided as tank, dps, and heal.
  • Diablo 3: all 5 classes at level 60.
  • Path of Exile: all 6 classes at level 60+.
  • DotA: every hero played (up to a certain version).
  • Starcraft 2: all 3 races to level 30.

In WoW, the game I have definitely spent the most time on, my two main characters when I raided were a Priest (disc/shadow) and Paladin (prot/holy), having all 3 roles covered. Even within one specialization, I switched out strategies all the time: one day I would stack haste, the next day I would stack crit, and so on. Even so, I was usually very indecisive about what to do until the last moment.

My blogging follows a similar pattern. I find it hard to focus on one topic to write about in consecutive posts, and I generally cover whatever topic comes to mind. Yes, I set a schedule of one post per week. However, I usually don’t come up with a topic until the last day. The topic for this post did not arise until yesterday, from the suggestion of a friend (whom we were visiting also as a result of a spontaneous decision).

Being too spontaneous, however, also didn’t work well. In 2011 I decided to blog spontaneously (see the first link). Largely due to indecision, I ended up writing only 33 posts the entire year, 20 of which were written in the first two months. By contrast, in the December of 2010, I wrote 38 posts. The current system of sticking with a posting schedule but not a topic schedule is working much better, as every once in a while it forces me to make a decision and choose some topic to write about. This removes indecision from the equation.

(Edit: Due to an inordinate amount of spam on this page, the the comments are disabled.)

Math or Computer Science?

Well this is an interesting situation. Just a month ago I announced that I was adding a computer science degree, so that I am now double majoring in math and computer science. The title of the post, after all, is “Computer Science AND Math.” Given the circumstances at that time, I think it was a good decision. My work experience had been mostly in software, and a CS degree from Cornell should look pretty good. In addition, I was wanting a more practical skillset.

decisions-2

In the past week, however, things have changed. I received and accepted an internship offer from my dream workplace, based on my background in mathematics and not in CS (though my prior CS experience was a plus). Based on this new situation, I have considered dropping the CS major (next semester) and taking more advanced math:

  • The CS degree has some strict course requirements, and I am afraid that if I go for the degree, I may be forced to skip certain math classes that I really want to take. For instance, I may have to take a required CS class next semester that has a time conflict with graduate Dynamical Systems, or with Combinatorics II. And given that I am currently a second-semester junior, I don’t have that much time left at college.
  • Even this semester, I am taking Algorithms, which meets at the same time as graduate Algebraic Topology. While Algorithms is pretty interesting and the professor is excellent, I am already very familiar with many if not most of the algorithms, extremely familiar with the methods of proof, and I feel that the experience is not as rewarding as possibly taking Algebraic Topology with Allen Hatcher, who wrote the textbook on the subject. I feel that I could learn algorithms at virtually any time I want. But learning algebraic topology with Allen Hatcher is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I am afraid I am missing just because I want to get a CS degree to look good.
  • Even not being a CS major, I will still be taking some CS classes out of curiosity. However, these classes will no longer feel forced, and will not restrict me from taking the higher level math courses that I want to take.
  • My risk strategy for grad school is different now because of the internship. In the past, I would have been willing to take a decent grad school in math or really good job. (I would prefer grad school over getting a job, but of course, a good job is better than a mediocre grad school.) However, now that I have my dream internship, I am willing to play the grad school game with more risk.
  • But whether for grad school, trading, or just for curiosity, I would prefer taking advanced (graduate) math classes over undergraduate CS classes. In a sense, my taking of the CS degree was a hedge bet, as I wanted to reduce the possible cost of the worst case scenario. I knew that it would directly inhibit my ability to take advanced math classes via class time conflicts, but the thought was that if I couldn’t get into a good math grad school or get a good job using math, at least I would have a CS degree from Cornell. But, in this new situation, I think the risk is significantly reduced and the hedge is no longer necessary.

Interestingly enough, the primary motivation for dropping CS wouldn’t be to slack off, but to be able to explore more advanced math. (At least, that’s what I tell myself.)

I think this might be the second time in my life where I have had to make an important decision. (The first time was deciding where to go to college, and I certainly think I made the right choice there.) Unfortunately, I really can’t be both taking as many interesting math courses as I can, and at the same time be pursuing a CS degree. As much overlap as there is, I can’t do both. In an ideal world this might be possible, but not currently at Cornell.

So instead of the idea of having math and computer science, I am now having to think in terms of math or computer science. I am currently in favor of going with math, but I am not completely sure.

Edit: Thanks for the discussion on Facebook.