Rationality vs Irrationality

This article is based on several conversations I’ve had recently on rationality, and it is supposed to be an overview-type post that explores different areas of the subject. In fact, since this is a pretty heated topic that comes with misunderstandings by the handful, I will be going very slowly and throwing out as many caveats as possible to make sure I’m not misunderstood, though of course this is bound to happen. Because of this, the tone for this article will be rather informal.

Rationality vs Irrationality

It is obvious (to anyone who follows this blog or knows me in real life) that I stand on the side of rationality (though I often intentionally do things that would be considered irrational). Heck, even the blog name is “A Reasoner‘s Miscellany.” Note that the title is not “A Reasoner’s Manifesto” or “A Reasoner’s Main Ideas.” Rather, it is a “miscellany” of various ideas in various subjects and of various degrees of significance. The main purpose of this blog is to jot down random ideas, serve as a diary of thoughts, and also just to satisfy my urge to write. It is not to try to start a revolution or to promote any particular ideology.

Answering this question obviously depends on having precise definitions of what rationality and irrationality are, but as soon as I lay down definitions, some of you will start arguing the definitions rather than the actual concepts. And without this disclaimer, some of you will be arguing “Well it depends on the definitions” as if that refutes my overall argument. It turns out you’re in luck, because in this post, I’m not trying to make any grand overarching arguments, but instead just laying down a bunch of thoughts, which might be followed up on in later blog posts with more fully fleshed out arguments.

Now that many of the meta-caveats are out of the way, I suppose I can finally begin talking about rationality. Of course, even without giving detailed definitions, I feel as if I must give some overall definition to anchor the discussion. Basically, when I refer to rational thinking, I refer to thinking involving logic, facts, evidence, and reason. This is opposed to irrational thinking, which I consider to be thinking involving emotion, faith, or just not thinking (or even the refusal to think). These characterizations don’t exactly match the conventional philosophical terms (which are themselves sometimes disagreed upon), but I think this captures what is generally meant when someone says “That thought process is rational” or “That thought process is irrational.”

Biases are one of the primary obstructions to reason. Two perfectly rational agents using perfect logic and starting with the same information should theoretically arrive at the same conclusion. However, the “perfect logic” assumption is ruined if one of the agents is biased towards one side from the beginning and uses that bias in their “logic,” at which point it is no longer logic. Of course, one of the most important biases is that you are less biased than other people. Thus I must try my best to account for major personal impacts in my life that would push me towards rationality.

The main event influencing my choice towards reason is when I started learning about astronomy when I was in first grade, in South Carolina of all places. We visited an observatory and I quickly became interested in space. Even then, I realized that knowing all these things about space must have occurred through some systematic method of observation, experimentation, and reasoning (though not in terms of these words). We knew there were nine planets (back then, Pluto was a planet) because we saw them through our telescopes and reasoned their existence through their movements and gravitational effects, not because we wished there were nine, or because it would be totally awesome if there were nine, or because it was divinely revealed to us that there were nine.

Religion and Tradition Both Oppose Rationality

Because of my early interest in space I learned by 1st grade about the Galileo incident with the Church (and also about Copernicus to a lesser degree). It didn’t just bother me that the vast majority of people were so ludicrously wrong about something like whether Earth revolves around the Sun or the Sun revolves around the Earth, but rather, that the Church refused to believe the truth and instead demonized the bringer of truth, doing so because they so adamantly believed that the Sun orbits the Earth because their holy book said so. From the moment I learned about this, I could never take “religious logic” seriously (i.e., X is true because it says so in the Bible/Quran/etc).

My views on religion have changed a lot since 1st grade. For instance, my main objection to religion now is not so much that it is fictional, but rather because of the vast social harm it causes due to its irrationality. In fact, throughout most of my life I subscribed to multiculturalism (regarding religion, you have to respect religious ideas no matter how insane they are), and so I wasn’t an antitheist. It was only a year ago that I went from (agnostic) atheist to (agnostic) atheist antitheist.

Another great opponent to rationality is tradition. Similarly to religion, tradition in principle stifles new ideas and is very bad a providing reasonable justification for doing something, i.e. “Because it says so in the Bible” or “Because that’s how it has always been done.” Again along the lines of biases, I have to warn that I am probably personally vested in this topic of tradition vs rationality as I extremely resented how I was treated in my childhood from my Asian parents, and also due to my view of Chinese culture in general. For an explanation, see this post and this one. In context of this post, even at a young age I was capable of making logical arguments and it always frustrated me that whenever I argued with my parents, they could never actually refute what I said, only justifying their actions through tradition, superstition, and authority. I’ve never mentioned it on this blog before, and only to a few people in real life, but in my childhood I was driven by my parents to near suicide. These anti-tradition, anti-superstition, and anti-authority sentiments have persisted.

Intentional vs Unintentional Irrationality

This summer I probably thought about rationality more than I ever have in the past, as my work had to do with making rational decisions. The book Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel Kahneman (Nobel Prize winner), made an significant impact. The primary reason I wrote the post “Pride in Things Out of Your Control” was that it was something that I found deeply irrational even though it was being expressed by a number of highly rational people. The fact that it was on July 4th given the subject was pure coincidence.

But that topic was on something that most people probably never think about. Because of this, it’s much harder to call someone with this kind of view “irrational,” as they probably aren’t aware of it. On the other hand, if someone say read that post and thought about pride in randomness, and afterwards still thought it was rational to be proud of one’s race, then it is much easier to consider them irrational. Similarly, I don’t find most religious people irrational since most religious people (at least of the ones I know) never talk about religion, thus they probably aren’t ever in a serious state of questioning religion. On the other hand, some religious people read science books (particularly on evolution) and still believe in creationism, thus it is much easier to consider these people irrational. Just as refusing to accept that Earth orbits the Sun (based on religious texts) is worse than simply not knowing about it, refusing to learn about evolution (based on religious texts) is worse not knowing about evolution. See willful ignorance.

Rationality vs Irrationality in the Media

The distinction between rationality and irrationality is related to many others, like Enlightenment vs Romanticism, future utopia vs past utopia, objective truth vs subjective truth, or science vs religion. If anything, support of irrationality is significantly overrepresented in the media. Does the following movie setting sound (overly) familiar?: The future, advanced technology, but with social inequality, terrible quality of life, what it means to be “human” is gone, nature is destroyed, and evil technologists or even machines rule as the result of the rise of the “rational,” and the day is saved by someone with an old-fashioned, “irrational” mentality often involving some mythical power? Nah, that sounds like a completely original idea. What about the one where nature overcomes technology? Or the religious guy who no one believes who is right the whole time? Or the evil scientist showing that science is bad? Or society claims to know how to treat the “irrational,” using nefarious tactics?

Sure, these are just movies mostly for entertainment purpose, and any societal warnings are a secondary effect. Perhaps I’m way overreacting. I mean, a movie or a novel has to have dramatic conflict, and movie about the future being an awesome place would be really boring to watch. But this does not mean the framing of which side is “good” and which side is “bad” should be so one-sided. One of the only shows that takes the pro-rational side is Star Trek (the [earlier] TV shows, not so much the recent movies). Characters like Spock and Data are as logical as you can possibly get, yet they are on the team of the protagonists. Technology is shown as overall beneficial, and even religion has almost disappeared from humanity (though some of the aliens they encounter have their own religions). In fact, it seems like if some show like Star Trek, The Original Series or The Next Generation, were to be released in modern day, 2013, it would be canned and be deemed far too political and “anti-religious,” as American society is far more anti-science than before (I find it hard to imagine the modern US having a warm reaction to a hypothetical modern-day version of Albert Einstein.)

The only other type of show I can think of that is pro-reason is crime investigation shows, where the protagonists try to rationally deduce facts from clues and from suspects, many of whom committed crimes for highly irrational purposes. But the main theme for these shows are normally concerned with justice, not rationality vs irrationality.

The Rationality of Irrationality

In the second paragraph, I mentioned that I sometimes intentionally act “irrationally.” However, many of these irrationalities are still made from an overall rational decision. In the post “Spontaneous Decision Making,” I talked about how I generally “…don’t plan ahead details ahead of time, as I abhor fixed schedules or fixed paths.” I will re-quote here an interesting behavior from my Fall 2010 semester:

For example, last semester, to get to one of my classes from my dorm I had two main paths, one going over the Thurston Bridge and the other over a smaller bridge that went by a waterfall. For the first couple weeks I took the Thurston Bridge path exclusively, as I thought it was shorter than the waterfall path. But then one day I went the other path and timed it, with about the same time, maybe a minute slower (out of a total of 15 minutes). So I started taking the waterfall path exclusively. But eventually that got boring too, so I started alternating every time. You might think that’s how it ended.

But a consistent change like that is still… consistent. Still the same. It was still repetitive, and still very predictable. Perhaps the mathematical side of me started running pattern-search algorithms or something. Eventually, I ended up on a random schedule, not repeating the same pattern in any given span of 3 or 4 days.

But as I later reasoned in the “Spontaneous Decisions” post, there was a method in the madness. I go against patterns on purpose, but all this increases versatility. I try to be prepared for anything, and if I always do the same pattern or plan everything out ahead of time, then I may not be able to adapt quickly to a new situation.

Another set of examples comes from video games. I tend to play extremely flexible classes/builds that have multiple purposes, and I try to have multiple characters or styles to be able to adapt quickly and to know what other people are thinking…

To have a quick response, I try to be accustomed to every scenario, and moreover, practice responding quickly. It is a sort of planned spontaneity. Intentionally making spontaneous decisions is like handicapping yourself during practice. But then when you get to the real thing, you remove the handicap and perform much better. If you can make a good assessment of a situation in 10 seconds, imagine how much better it would be with 10 hours.

In addition, the planned spontaneity is very much like preparing for a later event. Comedians spend a bunch of time preparing content so that it seems spontaneous when they perform it. In speed chess, when you don’t have time to think, the only thing that helps is prior experience. To quote Oscar Wilde: “To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up.”

Is Art Irrational?

Anti-rationalists often point to art, implying that to be rational is to see art as pointless. Art is indeed a more subjective experience, but is it totally subjective? Many great artists and novelists created works that expressed the style or discontent of their times. In the same way I see history as useful because it provides us with a context with which to view the modern world and the future, I see art as useful to see not just the time period of the artist, but also the lives of the artists themselves. To say “art is subjective” and end discussion with that is a very naive move that shows either a shallow understanding of art or a participation card in the “all truth is subjective” movement.

I can have rational discussions of art, novels, films, TV shows, video games, etc. When you want another’s opinion on a new painting from a famous artist and you have artist friends, who do you consult? Do you go on the streets and find a hobo or crack dealer and ask him about the art? Do you ask your favorite 6-year old relative? Do you consult a physics professor? No, probably not. Even though “art is subjective” and beauty is in the eye of the beholder, you go to the fellow artist or art critic to hear their professional, trained opinion. If the art critic’s opinion is worth more than that of the average person, then there must be some part of art that is objective. If you met someone at a formal event who said, “I hate the Mona Lisa, it’s a terrible piece of art!” you would probably think this person is uncultured and has an inferior art opinion despite your belief that art is subjective.

Ordinary Faith vs Religious Faith

It is perfectly rational to have faith in the conventional sense, but it is almost always irrational to have faith of the religious variety. I am okay with believing something with no proof if I still consider it a reasonable decision. Do I have absolute proof that the Sun will come up tomorrow? No, but I’ll bet anyone 10,000 to 1 odds that it will (if it doesn’t, I’ll give you $10,000; if it does, you owe me $1). For me to make this bet, that means I have to believe the probability of the Sun coming up tomorrow is >99.99%, given certain risk aversion preferences. If a billionaire whom I was best friends with and a homeless beggar both asked me for $100 as investment money and promised to give me a $50 a year for the next 10 years, given that I trust the billionaire sufficiently (and that inflation/interest rates are as they are now), I would give it to the billionaire (i.e. I would have faith in this billionaire), but would obviously not give any money to the beggar. Rationally, anything with a high enough probability of happening and with a low enough max cost, is reasonable to believe.

Religious faith corrupts the usual concept of faith. Instead of having strong evidence (the Sun has come up every single day since recorded history and according to science there is nothing to suggest a high probability of the Sun not coming up tomorrow; or this person is a self-made billionaire and so must know how to invest money, and is also a good friend) and therefore believing something, I am given ZERO evidence and expected to believe something. Not even a speck of evidence.

Conclusion

This article wasn’t really written in a way that lends to a conclusion, but given the length, I find it nonetheless necessary to include a “Conclusion” section. The post was much longer than I expected (around 2900 words), but I think I gained a more organized view of these ideas. The topic is, of course, open to rational debate.

Blogging, Controversy, and Meta-Controversy

Last week I wrote a pretty direct post on religion, and it quickly became the third most-read post on my blog in the past year, first being this one math post that somehow has really good Google pagerank.

Also, tomorrow, November 4, is the day this blog turns 4 years old, so I’ll go through some of the most-viewed posts of the past year.

1. Mind Blowing Mathematical Equations

\displaystyle \sum_{n} \frac{1}{n^s} = \prod_{p} {\frac{1}{1 - \frac{1}{p^s}}}

This post was written back in 2011, and it seems to have caught on by showing up really high on google searches for math. Instead of spiking and then decaying, as in the case for most posts, this one has steadily climbed over time, with 13,847 cumulative views. However, I suspect posts like this are the exception to the rule… [Link]

math-equations-stats

2. Tumblr vs WordPress

WordPress Screenshot

Posts in the form “X vs Y” are pretty popular, and this was written in 2010. Perhaps I should do more “Versus” articles. [Link]

3. My Views on Religion

Scarlet A

This was the first time I tried to do a broad overview (instead of talking about specific parts of religion as usual), and I think it overall succeeded. However, the main problem is that the breadth was gained at the cost of depth, as I couldn’t really put too much explanation for any specific point. This caused an unfortunate number of misunderstandings (as shown on the Facebook thread), but I learned quite a bit about peoples’ religious views from it. I also learned that more controversial stuff gets way more pageviews. [It’s literally the previous post.]

4. Myers-Briggs

mbti-diagram

This post was on my Myers-Briggs type, which is INTP. I’m not really sure why this got popular. [Link]

5. Closeted Homophobes

oppressed

This was a response to a CNN opinion piece that talked about how Christianity was becoming “a hated minority,” and that “Evangelical Christians say they are the new victims of intolerance – they’re persecuted for condemning homosexuality,” and “a new victim: closeted Christians who believe the Bible condemns homosexuality but will not say so publicly for fear of being labeled a hateful bigot.” I think it’s pretty obvious why this got many views. [Link]

6. Winning with 21.8% of the Popular Vote

USA Map Extreme Win

Using some math, I determined how much of the popular vote you need to win a presidential election (assuming everyone votes and electors are faithful). [Link]

7. Fundamentalists vs Moderates

Westboro-Baptist-Church

This post generated quite a bit of discussion on Facebook, particularly because I took the less-favored side. [Link]

8. Degree of Atheist Views on Social Issues

red-equals-sign

This was written on the day everyone used that as their FB profile picture. I argued that since atheists have no holy text instructing them to restrict peoples’ rights, the “debates” seem pointless.  [Link]

9. Race and Miss America

nina_davuluri

While there were plenty of voices criticizing the negative racism regarding this year’s Miss America, there weren’t as many on the positive racism. This got pretty popular with some heated debate. [Link]

10. College Stress and GPA-Centrism

stress

This was particularly addressed to Cornell regarding its high-stress environment. [Link]

Controversy

Apart from 1 and 4, all of the top viewed articles were on some controversial topic. This isn’t a good representation of a normal post—I write plenty of non-controversial posts. On average, however, the controversial ones get far more views, which makes sense as people are more likely to click a link to a stance with which they strongly agree or disagree.

In addition, the posts on religion get an abnormally high amount of views, even compared to posts on other controversial topics. I suspect that this is because of the taboo status of religion, i.e., because it is not only that religion is controversial, but that the discussion of religion is controversial…

Meta-Controversy

One topic that interests me is why certain topics are controversial and why even the discussion of certain topics is controversial. (If this topic itself is controversial, does it become meta-meta-controversy?)

As discussed before, the taboo on religion basically acts as a shield preventing it from criticism, and even protects its more intolerant beliefs from criticism.

There is an undeserved respect of religion in our culture. In daily life it is considered perfectly okay to argue about our favorite sports teams, our differences of taste in food and music, and even our political beliefs. But the moment religion is brought up, it suddenly becomes “rude” or “offensive” to disagree with a believer or to even slightly question his or her beliefs. This, of course, is prime hypocrisy as many religions downright treat agnostics and atheists as subhuman or fools: “The fool hath said in his heart, ‘There is no God.’” (Psalm 14:1). Imagine the public outcry that would occur if, in some atheist meeting, the members called all religious believers “fools.” Yet when religious people call all atheists “fools,” it’s perfectly okay, because you got to respect their religious beliefs. I suppose when religious people call blacks or women inferior, you’re supposed to respect that too? Does the religiosity of a belief make it immune to criticism?

The defensive nature of the taboo may not be coincidental, according to Daniel Dennett in Breaking the Spell, but I’ll talk about that later. Anyways, the point is that the discussion of religion should not be discouraged. Moreover, the discussion of taboo becomes a sort of meta-controversy.

Based on the stats, namely that the controversial stuff is significantly more popular, I’m going to write them as a higher percentage of posts. Here’s to a good 5th year!

Thinking of a Topic to Write About

clock

From 4 to 9 pm today, I’ve been intermittently trying to come up with a blog post topic. Yes, writing is painful, but thinking of a topic can be even more painful, since you are haunted by the fact that you still haven’t put words on the page yet.

In the end, the topic I chose was the process of thinking of a topic. Yeah, time for a meta blog post.

Most advice in thinking of a topic to write about is obvious. Write about what you are passionate about, write in an atmosphere that suits you, write from your unique experiences, etc. You can find all this typical advice in a google search (there, I even googled it for you, you’re welcome).

Instead, I’ll write about learning from personal writing habits. Of course, my writing habits are largely based on my personality type: an indecisive, perfectionist INTP. This leads to the following habits:

  • My writing times are extremely spontaneous. I have written articles months in advance before posting them, but more often than not I have no idea what I am going to write about until I actually write something at the last minute. And then, there are days which I publish multiple posts, like last week.
  • Productivity usually occurs in bursts. There are moments when I can write a lot, but usually I am rethinking something over and over. This happens in coming up with a topic as well: I can spend 30 minutes not knowing what to write about, and then come up with three fresh topics in the next 2 minutes.
  • I am more productive when I have many things to do. In fact, when I have significantly more time, I end up not being that much more productive. It’s when I have no work to do that I can’t think of a topic to write about.

Heck, I actually ran into this issue before:

If I had a number one enemy, this would be it. You might have encountered this too. A lot of times I would hit the NEW POST button on WordPress and just sit there for the next five or ten minutes not knowing what to write about. Eventually I get sidetracked, maybe check email and Facebook, sometimes StumbleUpon, then abandon the blog post altogether. Even worse, sometimes I’ll think of the perfect idea for an article, then when I get back to my room to start writing, I don’t have the faintest idea what it was.

Perhaps in coming up with ideas, I should follow my own advice from two years ago:

To avoid forgetting ideas, you should best write them down. To come up with ideas is more difficult. You could try idea-generating sites to start out. WordPress this year started its PostADay project; bloggers try to make a post every day for the year. Each day, the site chooses a topic that bloggers can optionally select for their posts. Today’s topic, for example, is “What’s the most trouble you’ve ever been in?”

There are plenty of other ways to find writing topics. Reading the news is definitely a good way, as there is often bound to be an article that you can write about. Talking with people is great as well. Other people always have great ideas—make sure you cite them though.

I’ll certainly keep this in mind.

In addition, I find I am significantly more productive when closer to a deadline for schoolwork and writing. Hence it might seem worth it to artificially hasten the deadline to be productive at an earlier time.

So far, a successful tactic has been forcing myself to have a topic prepared by Saturday, so on Sunday I can write about it and not have to worry about coming up with the topic. This week, I did not do so, and as a consequence I did not begin writing until 9 pm.

Anyways, write down your ideas and stay posted for next week.

(Of course, in the middle of constructing this article, several topics occurred to me. There should be some corollary to Murphy’s law regarding this: When something good can happen, it will only happen at the worst possible time.)

Spontaneous Decision Making

Decision

This post is about my own decision-making habits. In particular, I don’t plan ahead details ahead of time, as I abhor fixed schedules or fixed paths. Perhaps an interesting case is from a 2011 post:

For example, last semester, to get to one of my classes from my dorm I had two main paths, one going over the Thurston Bridge and the other over a smaller bridge that went by a waterfall. For the first couple weeks I took the Thurston Bridge path exclusively, as I thought it was shorter than the waterfall path. But then one day I went the other path and timed it, with about the same time, maybe a minute slower (out of a total of 15 minutes). So I started taking the waterfall path exclusively. But eventually that got boring too, so I started alternating every time. You might think that’s how it ended.

But a consistent change like that is still… consistent. Still the same. It was still repetitive, and still very predictable. Perhaps the mathematical side of me started running pattern-search algorithms or something. Eventually, I ended up on a random schedule, not repeating the same pattern in any given span of 3 or 4 days.

This example involved physical paths, but it is true for figurative paths as well. I can’t stand any repetitive task for a long time, including for things that I might like.

Another set of examples comes from video games. I tend to play extremely flexible classes/builds that have multiple purposes, and I try to have multiple characters or styles to be able to adapt quickly and to know what other people are thinking:

  • World of Warcraft: 8 (out of 11) classes at level 85+; raided as tank, dps, and heal.
  • Diablo 3: all 5 classes at level 60.
  • Path of Exile: all 6 classes at level 60+.
  • DotA: every hero played (up to a certain version).
  • Starcraft 2: all 3 races to level 30.

In WoW, the game I have definitely spent the most time on, my two main characters when I raided were a Priest (disc/shadow) and Paladin (prot/holy), having all 3 roles covered. Even within one specialization, I switched out strategies all the time: one day I would stack haste, the next day I would stack crit, and so on. Even so, I was usually very indecisive about what to do until the last moment.

My blogging follows a similar pattern. I find it hard to focus on one topic to write about in consecutive posts, and I generally cover whatever topic comes to mind. Yes, I set a schedule of one post per week. However, I usually don’t come up with a topic until the last day. The topic for this post did not arise until yesterday, from the suggestion of a friend (whom we were visiting also as a result of a spontaneous decision).

Being too spontaneous, however, also didn’t work well. In 2011 I decided to blog spontaneously (see the first link). Largely due to indecision, I ended up writing only 33 posts the entire year, 20 of which were written in the first two months. By contrast, in the December of 2010, I wrote 38 posts. The current system of sticking with a posting schedule but not a topic schedule is working much better, as every once in a while it forces me to make a decision and choose some topic to write about. This removes indecision from the equation.

(Edit: Due to an inordinate amount of spam on this page, the the comments are disabled.)

Blogging, Chess, and the Sunk Cost Fallacy

Since the summer began, I have again fallen into an inconsistent posting schedule, one of the things I was trying hardest to avoid. One of the reasons is that I still have retained a perfectionist attitude, that to write something, it needs somehow to be interesting or insightful, and in addition, written well. Otherwise, I thought, someone else would have just written something that is strictly better.

But as a result, I end up scrapping many of my drafts and never following up on them, and I rarely actually publish anything. Of course, this relates to other areas of life as well. I often try very hard to avoid situations where I could make mistakes, rather than just making mistakes and learning from them.

This summer I have been getting back into chess, and a few weeks ago I noticed something that I had never noticed before. It was in a game of blitz chess, or speed chess, where the clock is as much the enemy as the person seated across is. In general I played moves fast, but the moment I made an error, I froze up and wasted a lot of time. Quite fittingly, we had earlier in the day a lecture about illusions and cognitive biases, including the sunk cost fallacy. The rational thing would have been to keep playing fast, reasonable moves to keep a time advantage. However, after making the blunder, which was losing a Knight if I recall correctly, I kept thinking about how to recover the piece instead of just playing reasonable moves. My teammate, who was also the person who gave the talk, rightfully yelled at me to keep playing quickly when I froze up.

This story is a lesson in thinking rationally even in unfamiliar or just downright messy situations. In general I catch my mistakes quickly, thus it is rarely an issue in everyday activity or even in an interview. But in chess (and in trading), there is no taking back a mistake, only continuing on making good moves even with a bad position.

Perfectionism, while sometimes useful, is something I am trying to shake off. I will post on a regular schedule (it really is like the fifth time I’ve said that), perhaps put up a few chess games, and try to make some mistakes. A weekly posting schedule, namely every Sunday, seemed to work well for a while, so I am bringing that back online. Enjoy!

(Edit: Don’t worry math people, I’ll try to resurrect the math blog too.)

My Spring 2013 Semester

I am sorry for not having posted in a month. My schedule has been busymainly from some heavy projects in computer science courses.

pipelined_processor

For instance, one of our projects was to implement the above with fully functional logic circuits. If anyone is wondering, this diagram outlines the high-level design of a pipelined computer processor. We then wrote some assembly code to run on this processor, specifically to compute the stopping time of the hailstone function.

As a result of the CS workload, I haven’t had much time to do math—my math blog has not been updated since March.

Anyway, this has been my busiest semester yet at Cornell. Now that classes are over, I will get back into a weekly posting schedule.

What I Learned from 2012, and My Topics for 2013

calendar

I’ve had a pretty busy start-of-the-year so far, and I plan to get into a regular posting schedule on this blog for 2013. Currently, the plan is one post every Sunday for the remainder of the year.

This decision was largely based on some past problems. Here are some issues I have identified with my blogging in the past, especially in the years 2011 and 2012.

Problems

  1. Lack of Schedule. I pretty much posted whenever, sometimes three times in a day, and other times not a single post for months. This is ultimately not a good way to attract regular readers.
  2. Incoherency. As I wrote in my reflection The Future of this Blog (2012), there is an issue with the sheer number of different topics. I have already partially solved this problem by making a dedicated math blog, so that on this current one, I do not have to worry about alienating those without an advanced math degree. However, my topics are still quite varied, and because of this, I feel that there is too much breadth and not enough depth.

Solutions

The one-post-every-Sunday rule gets rid of the first problem. The second problem is a bit more difficult, given that I had already tried to solve it, without much success.

board-meeting

So here is my new solution. I will write about the topics that I am most passionate about and those that I am strongest at writing about. After reviewing my blog history as well as my current interests, I have formulated a new list of topics.

1. Atheism and Religion

I have previously been quite passive about the subject of religion. But the more I read about and watch what happens in the world, the more I realize it is one of the biggest problems right now. The amount of intolerance and violence that is justified in the name of religion is astounding. And even when it is not explicitly invoked, it has caused, is causing, and will cause great detriment to scientific understanding and societal progress unless the discussion of religion is taken more seriously. Towards the end of last year, I started writing a few articles about atheism and religion. I hope to continue this discussion in 2013.

2. Writing

In the past, I used to write plenty about the writing process. Somewhere in 2011 I ended up just dropping the topic. I plan to pick it back up and perhaps make some writing advice posts.

3d blue Diagram with arrow

3. Productivity

Ever since I read Geoffrey Colvin’s excellent book Talent is Overrated, I have spent a lot of time thinking about productivity, as well as what I want to achieve with my life. Plus, I have written about productivity several times in the past.

4. College Life

Who is more qualified to talk about college life than an upperclassman college student? Just kidding about the qualification part. But I do think writing about college experiences can make college less of a mystery to the general community. And it might help convince you that I am an actual human and not some distant automaton on the internet.

5. Multi-Disciplinary Topics

I think one of my stronger skills right now is applying knowledge in one field to another. At least, I can do this on the internet. I played Diablo 3 last year, and was involved on the forums for some time. Using standard research skills, I wrote forum posts on how relevant ideas in probability, statistics, discrete mathematics, psychology, economics, history, and even sociology were responsible for many of the issues or situations in the game or player perception and responses to the game. These posts were all highly upvoted, linked many times and even reposted by other members of the community.

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6. Space: the Final Frontier

My interest in space goes back to first grade, when I first looked out at the skies through a telescope. Recently, some incredible discoveries were made, especially the statistical result that 17 BILLION stars in just the Milky Way have an Earth-sized planet! Moreover, the announcement of Mars colonization from MarsOne turned heads. I will be writing more space posts once MarsOne releases more details, for a human landing on Mars will be sure to provoke scientific curiosity around the world for years to come.

7. Mathematics

Fortunately, you are spared of math topics on this blog. Of course, I will be have them on my new math blog.

Final Remarks

If you have any reactions or topic suggestions, please leave a comment below.