WordPress, Blogger, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter

In the last three months of 2009, I have used all of the above. So what is the point of this post? Well, I wanted to reflect over my usage of each of these sites. Originally the title was WordPress vs. Blogger vs. Tumblr vs. Facebook vs. Twitter, but then I realized, no, that would be comparing ballads and limericks. Blogging vs. Micro-blogging. But I digress. Here is how I now view each one.

Facebook

I’ve had one since September 2007. Facebook is distinctly a social networking site, not a blogging one. One posts short status messages. At this time, there are two actions, “like” and “comment,” that can be done on these. It is very personal; massive amounts of individual pictures are uploaded. People can be tagged in pictures. Because of this, privacy is a large factor in Facebook.

Me? I suppose I use Facebook a lot. But much differently than I used to. My Facebook status updates right now are, ironically, links to WordPress posts from here. Automatically, of course.

Blogger

This one is what its name suggests: a blogging site. I’ve actually made two product blogs back in 2008, to provide official information for two WarCraft III maps, one that I started from scratch, and another co-edited. Sometime in October, I decided to create another one, a personalized one. I didn’t use it very much; in fact, I switched it over to WordPress. This very blog.

Tumblr

A friend suggested it in October of this year, so I tried it out. It has some nice concepts. It’s for blogging, but the catch is, you can’t comment on other people’s blogs, at least not directly. This makes it a unique, non-linear system. However, I don’t like it very much. I’m used to forums and normal blogs, where, to respond to a point, you simply make a comment. With Tumblr, you can instead “Reblog” a post, so that the original post will show up in its entirety on your page, and your comment will appear below it. Unique? Yes. But is unique necessarily good? No.

I know it only takes a few clicks to post a reblog, but it seems a waste of space to have the original post keep popping up. This is both Tumblr’s strength and weakness. It’s hard to make a conversation, let alone see one. Debates don’t work. Especially for an outsider trying to view the debate: on a forum or normal blog, one simply scrolls down through comments, but on Tumblr, one has to forage through a convoluted mess.

Right now I don’t use Tumblr.

Twitter

Dislike. Yes, it’s concise. But I find I use it right now solely to provide links to WordPress. To me, it seems Facebook is just a better version of Twitter.

WordPress

Amazing. It’s simply more powerful than Blogger. Plus, it doesn’t have the disadvantage I mentioned with Tumblr. Moreover, WordPress allows you to do much more than write a blog—it pretty much lets you design and contruct a full website.

Overall

If I had to rank these five sites for myself, it would be in this order:

  1. WordPress
  2. Facebook
  3. Blogger
  4. Tumblr
  5. Twitter

This is a totally subjective ranking, and may not be true for you.

3 thoughts on “WordPress, Blogger, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter”

  1. You were quite the one. Actually, I think Karan suggested it to me first, but I didn’t really listen until you made one for me in compsci. Or, was that Twitter? I know you made me make a Twitter. 😀

    Like

  2. I agree with most of what you said. However, with Tumblr, you don’t necessarily have to reblog a post to be able to respond to it. There are in fact ‘reply’ and ‘like’ functions.

    Like

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